Category Archives: Research for fiction

CHARACTERS WHO PLAY HIDE AND SEEK

Brainstorming a new story is always fun, especially when the characters jump off the page, shake my hand and introduce themselves, and then proceed to tell me their entire life history. After a couple of cups of coffee, I feel … Continue reading

Posted in Brainstorming characters, creating characters, fictional characters, historical fiction, minor characters, Research for fiction, secondary characters, seeking, unexpected plot twists | Leave a comment

HAPPY SNOOPY DANCING

Ever get unexpected news that makes you want to dance like happy Snoopy? I did. I recently learned that a trilogy I wrote a few years ago is being re-packaged into a three-in-one volume that will be entitled, BRIDES OF … Continue reading

Posted in Brides of Georgia, historical fiction, New Echota, new release, north Georgia fiction, old houses, Research for fiction, settings, Trail of Tears, War Between The States | Leave a comment

RESEARCH BOOKS–oh my!

In my last post I offered some suggestions for research sources, so in keeping with the research theme, I’d like to focus the spotlight a little tighter. While some of the best information can be gleaned from speaking directly with … Continue reading

Posted in character's occupations, creating setting, historic details, historical fiction, Research books, Research for fiction, writing tools | Leave a comment

NAVIGATING THE RESEARCH JOURNEY

When you’re a writer, research is part of the job. But here is the thing: some writers would rather have root canal surgery than endure what they consider the drudgery of research. I, on the other hand, am one of … Continue reading

Posted in backdrop for characters, character's occupations, creating setting, historic details, historical fiction, Research for fiction, World War I, writing tools | Leave a comment

SETTING–a character in itself

One of the questions writers get asked the most—after “How do you come up with your story ideas?”—is, how does an author decide where to place a story. Recently, an email from my agent prompted me to consider that question … Continue reading

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Sharing A Brain

A number of years ago, I attended a writing workshop focused on injecting more emotion into the opening scene of a story. The leader of this workshop, DiAnn Mills, used an effective tool for teaching this writing skill—she tapped into … Continue reading

Posted in ACFW Author, conflicting emotions, creating characters, fictional characters, historical fiction, Research for fiction | Leave a comment

STORY IDEAS?

As a writer, I am often asked, “Where do you get your ideas for stories?” The answer varies as much as the many stories that line the shelves of bookstores. I’ve stumbled across items in antique stores that set my … Continue reading

Posted in ACFW Author, family history, historic details, historical fiction, old houses, Research for fiction, seeking | Tagged | Leave a comment

TIME TRAVEL–for research

It’s no secret that I love research. Of course, my husband may have a differing opinion, especially when supper is late because I’ve been “time traveling.” Since I write historical fiction, sometimes it’s not easy finding the details I need … Continue reading

Posted in historic details, historic sawmills, historical fiction, New Echota, north Georgia fiction, novella collection, Research for fiction, Sunday houses, Sundays in Fredericksburg, Trail of Tears, traveling | Leave a comment

WHO IS THIS PERSON?

Who hasn’t read a book and encountered a character that seemed familiar—as if you’ve met that person before. A couple of weeks ago, I blogged about finding images—vintage photographs—to represent the characters in my historical fiction. Those pictures help me … Continue reading

Posted in ACFW Author, character photos, creating characters, fictional characters, historical fiction, Research for fiction | Leave a comment

WILL YOU TELL MY STORY?

One of the most frequently asked questions I hear is: “How do you come up with your characters?” My normal answer is “My characters have to speak to me before I can get to know them, and in order to … Continue reading

Posted in ACFW Author, character photos, creating characters, fictional characters, historical fiction, Research for fiction, story board, writing tools | Leave a comment